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Academics
Academics
English

Academics

Contact Us

Chad Wriglesworth
Associate Professor
519-884-8111 x 28283

Events

07 Oct, 2021
06:00 pm
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Welcome to the Department of English

Our department has perennially possessed a unique atmosphere that students and visitors can sense. We value close reading and big ideas, the minute particulars of the text and the deep, complex connection between literature and the worlds of contemplation and action, in history and now. Our dedication to traditional canonical literature, from medieval to contemporary, also involves enthusiastically exploring its relation to the innovative and the experimental. We participate in UW English’s distinctive combination of literary and rhetorical studies, and we contribute to communications studies for students in other disciplines.

 

In our classes we foster inspiring discussion and individualized learning, and we welcome conversation beyond the classroom. We pride ourselves on being approachable and present to our students. To study English at St. Jerome's University is to exercise scholarly rigour and creativity; to develop practical skills in writing and critical thinking while cultivating intellectual adventurousness; to encounter beauty; and to glimpse truth.

2021 Academic Achievement Award

Congratulations to 2021 graduate Katelin Hamilton for achieving the highest academic achievement in the Department of English.

 

Creative Connections
The St. Jerome's University Department of English:
 
  • Hosts the Reading Series, which has been bringing great Canadian writers to our community since 1984.
 
  • Is the home of the nationally recognized, award winning literary magazine The New Quarterly (TNQ).
 

 

  • Co-hosts The Raymond Carver Review, the most important academic journal for established and emerging scholars committed to the work of American short story writer, poet, and essayist, Raymond Carver (1938-1988). READ MORE

 

  • Includes Claire Tacon, host of the podcast Parallel Careers about the dual lives of writers who teach.