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Tristanne Connolly
Associate Professor
519-884-8111 x 28244
Department of English Research
St. Jerome's University has made its reputation over the years mainly through the excellence of its teaching. However, its contribution to the University of Waterloo and to higher learning in general also takes the form of strong scholarship and original research. Without this on-going work, the teaching at the University would be less rich and meaningful than it is.
 
Within the Department of English, some of the research areas include, but are not limited to:
 
  • The life-writings of medical personnel in war zones from the First World War onwards to better understand the psychological stress involved in such work
  • The representation of the body, sexuality and reproduction in British Romantic writing and illustration, especially William Blake’s illuminated books
  • The implications of a preponderance of citations from poetry in the Oxford English Dictionary for a conception of the denotative definition of words
  • The relationship between salmon, sacrament, and water reclamation in the Pacific northwest
  • The theology of Rowan Williams as a resource for understanding the making of the Christian imagination
  • Small words of volition in Shakespeare.
  • The intersection between the visual arts and contemporary Canadian and Caribbean literatures
 
Areas of Expertise
 

Faculty member

Research areas of expertise

Carol Acton

x28238

SH 2201

cgacton@uwaterloo.ca

  • War in literature and life-writing
  • Autobiography
  • Modern British writers, especially non-canonical women writers

Veronica Austen

x28300

SH 2202

vjausten@uwaterloo.ca

  • Canadian literature
  • Caribbean literature
  • Diaspora studies
  • Contemporary poetry and poetics
  • Visual arts in literature

Tristanne Connolly

x28244

SH 2203

tjconnolly@uwaterloo.ca

  • British Romantic literature and culture (especially poetry)
  • William Blake
  • Erasmus Darwin
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Medical writing and illustration
  • Literature and science
  • Religion and literature

Norm Klassen

x28223

SH 2205

n3klasse@uwaterloo.ca

  • Chaucer
  • Medieval English literature
  • Medieval humanism
  • Literature and Theology
  • Literary Theory

Alysia Kolentsis

x28280

SH 2206

amkolentsis@uwaterloo.ca

  • Shakespeare
  • Early modern drama and poetry
  • Early Modern English
  • The intersection of literature and linguistics
  • Language and gender
  • Pragmatics

David-Antoine Williams

x28287

SH 2208

david.williams@uwaterloo.ca

  • Poetry and/or poetics

Chad Wriglesworth

x28283

SH 2209

cwriglesworth@uwaterloo.ca

  • Twentieth century American literature
  • Ecocriticism and place studies
  • Religion and American culture
  • Native American literature
  • Literature and the American West

 

 

Recent research highlights:

Norm Klassen’s book, The Fellowship of the Beatific Vision: Chaucer on Overcoming Tyranny and Becoming Ourselves (2017) received third place in the Theology category of the Association of Catholic Publishers’ Excellence in Publishing Awards. Read SJU’s announcement of the award.

 

Just out, Canadian Music and American Culture: Get Away From Me, co-edited by Tristanne Connolly and Tomoyuki Iino (Sophia University, Tokyo), features essays by three SJU faculty members: in addition to Connolly on Rush, there’s Veronica Austen on Jann Arden and Mark Spielmacher on Max Webster (Kim Mitchell’s band). Read the UW English blog’s post about the book.

Our expertise, in terms of periods, includes a strong commitment to the tradition of British literature and various forms of contemporary literature: Chaucer; Shakespeare; British Romanticism; early twentieth-century British literature; contemporary poetry of the United Kingdom and Ireland; contemporary American literature; contemporary Canadian and postcolonial literatures.
 
In terms of topics: a strong interest in medieval humanism; rhetorical analysis; interactions of literary, artistic, and scientific culture; life-writing of participants in war; the tradition of poetic defence as pursued by leading contemporary poet-critics; literary theory and theological humanism; literature, religious thought, and environmental policy; literary diaspora.