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Admissions
House System
House System
St. Jerome’s – Hogwarts style
Who knew SJU could make you feel like Harry Potter? Even though we don’t have a Sorting Hat, all students who are registered or live at SJU automatically belong to one of four Houses, each with its own colour, tradition, symbols, and stories.
 
Game of Jerome’s          
Like a friendly version of Game of Thrones, the Houses organize events and battle one another in a variety of contests throughout the school year. But the rivalries are all in fun. So activate your competitive spirit, sign up to get involved, and help vanquish your arch frenemies!
  • Play on your House sports teams.
  • Support your House charity fundraising events.
  • Feast at a House dinner.
  • Cheer your team on to win the Commons Cup.
 
Honouring your House lineage
The Houses are named after prominent personalities who left a mark on St. Jerome’s University's history and who call to mind four key aspects of SJU’s holistic outlook:

 

 

Media Folder: 
Leon House
Academics: The gender symbols represent Sister Leon White’s commitment to empowering women through education. A long-time dedicated English professor and Dean of Women, she helped pioneer post-secondary opportunities for women at St. Jerome’s.
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Spetz House
Extracurriculars: Starting as a student when St. Jerome’s was still a college, Father Theobald Spetz went on to serve as president in 1890. The diploma is a reminder of his work toward affiliation with a university, and of his strong support for educating the whole person, learning outside the classroom, and team sports.
 
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Taylor House
Spiritual development: The first female chaplain at St. Jerome's, Sister Marie Taylor was devoted to students, connecting on a personal level and guiding the advancement of their faith. The dove stands for her encouragement of spiritual growth through all of her endeavours, past and present.
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Zinger House
Community service: Also a St. Jerome’s graduate, Father Albert Zinger became president in 1905, at only 31. His legacy includes the purchase of new property, the expansion of the curriculum, and the construction of St. Mary’s Hospital in Kitchener. The hammer recalls his roles in the physical and educational growth of the College community and in the building of connections with the broader community beyond.